Vintage Salem Morning!

Town House SquareTown House Square Salem MA 1891

The Stearn Building which housed H.P. Ives Bookstore once was flush with the corner of Short Street, which was long gone even in this photo. The building opposite the Stearn Building, on Short Lane, once held the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, after John Hancock took up Reverend Bentley’s offer to move it here after Boston was invaded during the Revolutionary War.  The offending part of the Stearn Building has been removed to make it now flush to the new corner of Washington Street and Essex Street. Most of the buildings behind it have long since been removed and the new ones are also flushed to the current location of Washington Street.

Also you can see the beginning of the tunnel that led to the underground train station in which goods were smuggled through from the Kinsman Building in the distance. Do you remember the fortune telling machine or the traffic cop in the box from here? Tell us below?

Send us your favorite vintage Salem photos to info@salemhousepress.com and we will post them and give you a shout out! Also if you have some to add about the photo from family histories, your readings, or your memories, please share them below in the comments section.

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Vintage Salem Morning

Jean Missud and his Second Corp of Cadets Marching Band in a parade down Essex Street in Salem MA. Jean wrote famous pieces like the March of the Witches and the Salem Gazebo is dedicated to him. It is even said that his band still can be heard around the gazebo playing a few ghostly tunes….

Send us your favorite vintage Salem photos to info@salemhousepress.com and we will post them and give you a shout out! Also if you have some to add about the photo from family histories, your readings, or your memories, please share them below in the comments section.

Vintage Salem Morning

Corner of Essex Street and Saint Peter’s Street

Corner of Essex Street and St. Peters Street with Sign reading Ted Coles

This is the second location of Ted Cole’s Music shop. The first I believe was on the corner of Front and Central Street in a building replaced by a cherry dogwood tree and an air conditioner unit. Previously in the location above was an Eaton Pharmacy. Now the East India Mall and the fountain have closed off Saint Peter’s access to this corner. Can you name where Ted Cole’s final location was?

Send us your favorite vintage Salem photos to info@salemhousepress.com and we will post them and give you a shout out! Also if you have something to add about the photo from family histories, your readings, or your memories, please share them below in the comments section.

Vintage Salem Morning!

This is the second church of the First Church of Salem. This was the first Congregation Church in America. During the time of the Witchcraft Hysteria this building was on the other side of the river that the cart followed to the hanging site on the ridge to the left outside of this photo. Later this building was moved to the location in this picture by the Proctor family.  This was the lot owned by John Proctor of the Crucible. He was hanged on the back left corner of his own lot. After crossing the drawbridge the cart turned left uphill on Pope Street. Pope Street led to the dump and was named by antipaptists. The Proctors used the building as a tavern and a horse stable. So it is safe to say the first church in the country was full of horse shit.  Later this building was removed to behind the Essex Institute. Later in 1914 this was the site where the 1914 Fire started in the Korn Leather Factory.

Send us your favorite vintage Salem photos to info@salemhousepress.com and we will post them and give you a shout out! Also if you have some to add about the photo from family histories, your readings, or your memories, please share them below in the comments section.

Vintage Salem Morning!

4 Views of a Secret. This tunnel running from Essex Street to the Tabernacle Church under Washington Street was used to hide the loading of contraband from the smuggling tunnels in Salem. The first track on the frog entering the tunnel was built by George Peabody whose plan has bankrupted our country every 20 years up to 2008. The second track on the frog was owned by Thomas Perkins the opium dealer who would smuggle runaway slaves to his sweatshops in Lowell. Eight tunnels met in the back of the Kinsman Building (Opus Underground) and one left the front to this tunnel in the photos. Kinsman was superintendent of the Eastern Railroad owned by Peabody.

For more info read Salem Secret Underground: The History of the Tunnels in the City and Sub Rosa by Chris Dowgin available at Wicked Good Books, Jolie Tea, Remember Salem, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon.com.

Vintage Salem Morning!

Salem Armory

Salem Armory on Essex Street. A favorite with many people in Salem. Burned down by someone who hated religions. This was burned down because Laurie Cabot held her Witch Balls here. He also burned the top floor of the Mason Lodge, St. Anne’s Church, and an out building on the La Salette Shrine in Ipswich.

Vintage Salem Morning!

Old Town Hall built on William Brown’s mansion property. William Brown was a Tory and ran to Newfoundland during the Revolutionary War. His kin Lucy Brown Derby inherited it and gave it to her father in Law Elias Hasket Derby Sr. This became America’s first millionaire’s 4th mansion in town. He only got to live in the mansion for a year before he died. Then Lucy got the mansion when her husband Elias Hasket Derby Jr. inherited the property. After spending his portion of the 10th largest estate in American history, Elias started selling off the mansion and grounds little by little.  In 1814 he will sell the property to the town to build Old Town Hall. Tunnel designers Samuel McIntire and Charles Bulfinch worked to create the building. One tunnel leaves the back of the building and connects to the Old Naumkeag Trust Building. It was helpful a few years ago to run cable for internet between the two buildings…

For more info read Salem Secret Underground:The History of the Tunnels in the City and Sub Rosa by Chris Dowgin available at Remember Salem, Jolie Tea, Wicked Good Books, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon.com.